Science News

Being a science lover, I enjoy being on top of recent science news and current hot research. I use two main sources for scientific reading and research: Science Daily (http://sciencedaily.com) and Scientific American (https://www.scientificamerican.com). Both websites publish huge amounts daily, but it’s easy to filter and find just what you’re interested in. I love reading articles about animal behavior, biology, and language acquisition and learning — as these are three things I am interested in studying myself! Here are three of my recent and favorite articles.

1.) Yes! Your pet can tell time! Woah, cool! The research this article presents concluded that there are special neurons and networks in the medial entorhinal cortex in animal brains that start firing when the animal experiences waiting. So yes, your dog is aware of how much time has passed since you left the house. Yes, your dog does notice those extra five minutes you take to produce kibble. (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181023130518.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Ftop_news%2Ftop_science+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Top+Science+News%29)

2.) Continuing on the topic of dogs, we all have experience saying something to a dog and he/she reacts. Why does an individual dog react differently to different things we say? How much do they understand of what we say? What is happening inside their brains? There is plenty we do not know about the human brain, let alone animal brains, but this study concluded that dog brains do react differently to language it has previously learned versus new language. This seems to suggest that dogs are reacting to the actual words they hear, not gestures or other indicators that accompany the words. (https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181015120901.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Ftop_news%2Ftop_science+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Top+Science+News%29)

3.) This study wanted to answer the following question: why are some words just plain easier to learn than others? Why do some words instantly stick where others can take years? The simple conclusion is that words that sound like what they mean are easier to learn than words that sound entirely unlike their definition. These words are called ideophones, and when we hear them, a visual or sensory perception is often evoked.(https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160211083046.htm)

So, fellow science-lovers, dog lovers, animal lovers, and language learners, I hope you enjoy these three articles!

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